Parenting Information

Understanding The Report


"No thank you. Don't bother to send me the report about the testing results. I won't understand it anyway. I'll just listen at the meeting."

Those were the words of more than one parent I spoke with whose children had been tested to see if they needed special education services. I could always hear the discouragement in their voices as they spoke.

I heard the same tone of voice in a person a little closer to home just recently. A relative of mine has a son who has just been evaluated, and the parents had been given a copy of the report. He and his wife both have college educations, and they still had difficulty understanding what was being said. He looked totally helpless as he showed me the paperwork.

It's important to realize that every occupation in life has it's own terms, and special education is no different. Unless you work in that occupation on a daily basis, you can't be expected to know what those terms mean - not much consolation when it's your child's education and success that are at stake.

The good news is that there is help out there.

Here are some suggestions for how you can become an informed, active participant in the meeting:

1) Contact the special education office in your school district. Either someone there can explain it to you, or they can tell you who to talk with to help you understand the report.

2) Set up an appointment to speak with the special education person in your child's school.

If you can't get the information you want through the special education office for some reason, call and decide on a mutually convenient time when you can meet with the special education teacher and discuss the results. Perhaps you can even discuss what the recommendations might be regarding the best placement and the best program for your child.

This way, when you go into the meeting, you will be more prepared.

3) Take notes as you discuss the report. If you take notes from the discussion, then you will have ready information to take into the meeting, and you won't be bogged down having to find the information in the report.

4) If you still have trouble understanding, you can contact your state Learning Disabilities Association. They will have answers for you and they may be able to suggest someone to go to the meeting with you to help you understand what is going on.

5) Know that it's okay to take someone into the meeting with you for support. Facing a group of professionals can be scary, whether you have a college degree or not. Having support with you can be very comforting, and if that support is someone who understands the process better than you, that's a bonus!

Remember, you are NOT alone in this process. You have a team of people who are there to help your child be successful. And working together as a team is the best way to make that happen. But, you have to play an active role in that team in order for your child to get the best services possible, and that may mean searching out people who can help you understand and take charge.

For more plain talk about learning disabilities, please visit us at www.ldperspectives.com.

About the Author
Sandy Gauvin is a retired educator who has seen learning disabilities from many perspectives - as the parent of a daughter with learning disabilities, as the teacher of children with learning disabilities, and as an advocate for others who have diagnosed and unrecognized learning disabilities. Sandy shares her wisdom and her resources at www.LDPerspectives.com.

  


MORE RESOURCES:

People Magazine

Emily Blunt: Parenting Is a 'Fear-Based Industry'
People Magazine
In the high-fashion spread, the actress, 31, shares her laissez-faire approach to parenting. “[Raising children] is such a fear-based industry,” Blunt says. “There used to be one book that everyone read, now there's How to Raise a Gluten-free Baby, How ...
Is parenting a “fear-based” industry? Emily Blunt thinks soBabyCenter (blog)
Emily Blunt: Parenting is a "Fear-Based Industry"Celebrity Baby Scoop
Emily Blunt Plays By Nobody's Rules, Calls Parenting "A Fear-Based Industry"Bustle
E! Online -Huffington Post
all 15 news articles »


What Parenting Really Looks Like
POPSUGAR
Rather, she's inspired by the truth that is parenting. "This is real, this is life, this is parenting. Parenting is so ugly, but there are moments that are so beautiful. Just when you think you have it under control and you're like, 'Oh, yeah, this is ...

and more »


Funniest Parenting Tweets: What Moms And Dads Said On Twitter This Week
Huffington Post
Our guest curator this week is Kate Hall, co-editor (with Science of Parenthood's Norine Dworkin-McDaniel and Jessica Ziegler) of The Big Book of Parenting Tweets. Kate also blogs at Can I Get Another Bottle of Whine? and right here on HuffPost Parents.



South Bay Parenting: It's OK to fib to the kids sometimes, right?
The Daily Breeze
Most of the time, it's to scare them into doing something that is actually good for them. I tell my finicky 5-year-old that he won't grow if he doesn't eat (a half-truth). I tell him that watching more than one “Sonic the Hedgehog” episode is bad for ...



Saturday Diary: Do my wife and I have a parenting philosophy? Not sure
Pittsburgh Post Gazette
WARNING: This diary contains annoying parental bragging. Not to mention that it steps all over the third-rail of social conversation: parenting. (The other two being religion and politics). Our elder son just got home yesterday from his first semester ...



PsychCentral.com (blog)

Innocent Parenting Style May Harm Kids in Adulthood
PsychCentral.com (blog)
A recent study from the University of Missouri and the University of Illinois at Chicago found that parents who use material goods as part of their parenting techniques may be setting children up for difficulties later in adulthood. “Our research ...
Three Ways to Raise a Materialistic ChildBoston.com (blog)

all 3 news articles »


Sensitive Parenting May Boost Kids' Social Skills, School Performance
U.S. News & World Report
THURSDAY, Dec. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The type of parenting children receive at an early age may have a long-term effect on their social skills and school success, a new study indicates. The study included 243 people from poor families in ...

and more »


OCRegister

Parenting Voices: Grateful for the gift of a Christmas baby
OCRegister
Parenting Voices: Grateful for the gift of a Christmas baby. It took a near-tragedy for me to realize that life – with all its wonderful, challenging surprises – can bring joy in the most unexpected ways.



Roanoke County Public Schools sponsoring upcoming parenting classes
WDBJ7
Decca Knight teaches the Love and Logic method of parenting, a philosophy that Roanoke County public schools has been using for a few years now. decca knight/blue ridge parenting: what's really great wonderful, i think about love and logic is that it ...



Step-by-step directions for Frozen-inspired Hairdos
Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog)
If your daughter wants a her hair inspired by the princesses of “Frozen” a new book with step by step directions means there is no need for a professional to perfect these dazzling dos. “Disney Frozen Hairstyles: Inspired by Anna and Elsa” (Edda USA ...


Google News

Article List | Index | Site Map
All logos, trademarks and articles on this site are property and copyright of their respective owner(s).
The comments are property of their posters, all the rest is Copyright © 2006 CanadaSEEK.com - All Rights Reserved.